Bald Eagle in the Wild

I’ve never been able to photograph a wild bald eagle before. I’m not sure if I’ve even seen a wild bald eagle before! What a thrill, that the clouds would open up and my wife would say, “Hey, I know where a bald eagle is.”

Shot by my wife, under the tree, with the point & shoot:

 

 

Shot by me, further away with telephoto lens and tripod:

 

 

It’s awesome to see a majestic hunter such as this one, living a successful life among the human chaos.

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Stop messing with pixels, go out and SHOOT!

Ken Rockwell – Hobbyists vs. Photography

Amateurs built the ark, professionals built the titanic. That pretty much sums it up.

As much as it pains me to say it(1), he has a good point here. Today, when I shoot I’m trying my best to get the shot right in camera. I think that’s as good as can be expected with digital photography, because the bits and bytes of the file must be run through a computer in order to make a print. Certainly, those times where I miraculously do get a shot right with no processing required, that feels infinitely more rewarding than knowing another trick in Photoshop. Photography should be more like that, and less like calculating Space Shuttle trajectories.

(1) He has a sizable Leica collection, tons of very expensive Nikon gear, nice European cars, shoots only with the really expensive stuff when it really matters, yet we’re all supposed to stick with the D40 forever. Amateurs should stay amateurs, don’t crowd his business, and buy all our gear through his affiliate links to further pad his wallet. It’s not a “he’s rich, I’m jealous” thing, it’s a hypocrisy thing. If the D40 were all anyone needs, that should apply to him as well, but the truth is far from it. And, his images look awful. Over-saturated is putting it mildly. That said, even he can make a good point sometimes.

Late Summer at the Cabin

I love spending time at the family cabin. It’s nothing fancy – no electricity or running water – but it is an anchor to where I come from and who I am. I need to go there more often.

I wish people wouldn’t keep breaking in. Every year, there’s a few break-ins and some vandalism. No wonder I wish for mountain solitude away from people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tough Day

I went to Rocky Mountain National Park with a local photowalk group one day. It was very cold, and the wind was vicious. The sunrise was horrible and visibility was low.

 

All was not lost, however. I came across a pack of coyotes napping on the side of the road. The longest lens I brought was my 180mm f/2.8 manual focus lens, so I had to focus carefully and creep forward with the car. I didn’t get out, so that I wouldn’t disturb them. It was fun trying to get a good shot of these seemingly tame wildlife.

 

 

I noticed a nice scene on the side of the road as I drove home. A bad start became a good day.

 

New Year’s Eve in the Park

I spent the morning of New Year’s Eve up in Rocky Mountain National Park. I was hoping to make some images of wildlife, but it was cold.

 

 

 

 

I did see one animal. I tried to do the “wildlife photographer” thing, but a 70-200 + 1.4 tc can only get you so close, and he looked like he didn’t want to be bothered by my getting physically closer.